Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary’s Donkey Rescue

Rescued Donkeys have a Loving Home at FFAS

Our mission at the Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary is to provide a safe and permanent environment for donkeys rescued from abusive, neglectful, and dangerous situations. We work hard to to save these incredible animals while educating the public so we can create a safer, more sustainable future for them.  

Our first rescued donkey, Rico, has been a huge success. Rico was saved from a kill pen in Oklahoma. He had severe injuries and was labeled a hopeless case. We provided him with critical veterinary care funded by donations from supporters like you. Along with patience and love, Rico was rehabilitated and now loves the companionship of people.

Why is Donkey Rescue Urgent Now?

Donkey rescue is more important now than ever. A recent rise in the slaughter of donkeys for their hides has led to underpopulation in some countries. In China, where the gelatin from donkey hides is used to make a traditional medicine (known as ejiao), the donkey population has been decimated. China is now turning to Mexico and South America to keep up with demand. More and more traders in the United States are selling donkeys to Mexico, who sell them to China and other countries to be slaughtered.

Donkeys in captivity are often severely mistreated. Their average life span is between 25 – 30 years, although some can live up to 35 years with proper care. This long commitment can lead to abandonment by owners and lack of necessary veterinary services. Many donkeys are overworked as farm animals and left to die in pain.

Donkeys are Widely Misunderstood

There are pervasive stereotypes that they are stubborn animals and are a nuisance for landowners. To the contrary, donkeys are highly intelligent. They make great companions. They can form bonds with other donkeys, horses and other animals, and even people. They are playful and enjoy human interaction. Donkeys also have a high level of emotional intelligence. They can experience emotional anxiety even if they are only separated from their buddy for a short period of time. They are also known to grieve the death of a buddy.

Donkeys are Great Companions and Unique Service Providers

In addition to being great companions, donkeys provide critical and unique services. In some parts of the world, they are essential to farming, construction, and maintaining a clean water supply. Donkeys can create financial independence in impoverished communities. In the United States, donkeys are often used for camping and hiking. They can provide a unique experience and access to mountain trails that would otherwise be insurmountable.

Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary Rescues and Rehabilitates Donkeys

At the Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary, we provide life-changing and life-saving care for these incredible animals. After surviving an abusive or neglectful situation, donkeys need to be healed physically and psychologically so they can trust humans again. This requires patience, time, and love. Rescued donkeys have shown that despite a difficult past, they have much love to offer in return.

Our sponsorship program is an opportunity for you to be involved in saving a donkey’s life. We believe it is our responsibility to show compassion for these incredible animals that have so much to give in return. We hope you will help and sponsor one of these exceptional creatures.

Rico saying hello

Emotional Day on the Highway

Overcoming the Feeling of Helplessness

Have you ever had that horrible feeling that you were helpless? That you couldn’t do a single thing to change the outcome of what was about to happen. That was me yesterday. I was driving on the highway on my way back from rescuing Harriet and Cora, when I came upon a livestock transport truck in front of me. 

My heart sank.  I have been in the animal welfare community for several years.  I knew the fate of these animals and the conditions inside the truck. I knew the details of the horrors. I could see eyes peering through the holes in the truck, but I could not make out what animals were inside.   It was not until I started to pass the truck that I realized who was inside.  Sheep.  Lots and lots of sheep.  To think that these last few hours of their lives are filled with fear, fills my heart with pain and sadness.

As tears began streaming down my cheeks, I asked myself what could I do?  I became nauseous and numb.  For a moment, I thought I would follow this truck to its destination, but then reality set in and I realized there was nothing I could do.  I pulled off the highway and watched the truck continue its journey to the sheep’s horrific fate.

How to save abused animals?

I thought about the sheep that I have back at the Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary.  I rescued them from the same fate as the sheep on that truck. Andy, Rocky, Opal, Cora and Harriet, have become our ambassadors for the other sheep that are victimized by factory farms or sheep that are abused by their owners.

If you like to learn more on how you can help these awesome beings, please visit   https://www.freedomfarmanimalsanctuary.org/how-you-can-help/

 

Lisa Miskella

Founder / Executive Director

Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary

Cora before

Are Sheep Smart?

Sheep are extremely intelligent animals.  They can recognize faces of both humans and their flock mates.  They form individual friendships with certain members of their flock and become stressed if they cannot find their friends.

What are sheep raised for? Sheep are raised for both meat and wool. Is wool animal abuse? Yes, both are extremely cruel.

These animals are sentient beings, capable of feeling happiness and gratitude, as well as pain, suffering and grief. All these animals want is a safe, pain free life where they can be happy. These animals do not deserve the cruel fate that is being done to them, therefore my life’s work is to give as many farmed animals as I can, a life of a loving sanctuary, but I am only one sanctuary.

Cora

What is livestock transport really like?

Livestock transport truck

As we returned from rescuing two sheep, Harriet and Cora, we encountered a livestock transport truck, face to face. As an animal rescuer, I know what are the conditions inside such trucks and what the fate of these animals will be. But coming face to face with it brought horror that seared though my whole body.

I could see eyes peering through the holes in the truck, but I could not make out what animals were inside.  I assumed they were chickens or pigs because I have seen these animals inside transport trucks before.

It was not until I started to pass the truck that I realized who was inside.  Sheep.  Lots and lots of sheep.  Four levels high. Legs and faces squeezing out of the holes on the side of the truck.  Their wool being pushed through the holes due to the overcrowding inside. 

The animals in such livestock transport trucks are urinating and vomiting on each other, covering each other in their own feces.  The interior of these trucks is cold metal, with no bedding, or food or water. The consequences of animal transportation include stress, thermal discomfort, dehydration, weight loss, energy depletion, and fatigue. These animals can be on these trucks for 24-48 hours. These sentient beings are scared for their lives. To think that these last few hours of their lives are filled with fear, fills my heart and soul with pain and sadness.

Knowing enough about farmed animal abuse inside this truck was one of the many reasons I decided to create my Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary, to save as many animals as possible.

And we need your support to continue saving animals from such brutality.

If you like to learn more on how you can help these awesome beings, please visit us at https://freedomfarmanimalsanctuary.org/how-you-can-help.

 

Lisa Miskella

Founder / Executive Director

Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary

Livestock Transport Truck

What can we do to help abused animals?

As tears began streaming down my cheeks, I asked myshttps://www.freedomfarmanimalsanctuary.org/what-is-animal-transport-really-like/?et_fb=1&PageSpeed=off#elf what could I do?  I became nauseous and numb.  For a moment, I thought I would follow this truck to its destination, but then reality set in and I realized there was nothing I could do.  I pulled off the highway and watched the truck continue its journey to the sheep’s horrific fate.

I thought about the sheep that I have back at my Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary.  I rescued them from the same fate as the sheep on that truck. Andy, Rocky, Opal, Cora and Harriet, have become our ambassadors for the other sheep that are victimized by factory farms or sheep that are abused by their owners.

What are sheep raised for?  How do they make wool? Is wool cruelty-free?

Sheep are raised for both meat and wool. The sheep are disbudded, where the sensitive horns are seared off. Their tails are docked (cut off) to prevent the risk of flystrike, in which flies lay eggs in the feces stuck to the sheep’s rear end. The larvae can enter the sheep’s body and cause a painful death. Male sheep are castrated by placing a tight band around their testicles until they fall off.  All these methods of mutilation are performed without any pain medication.

All these animals want is a safe, pain free life where they can be happy. These animals do not deserve the cruel fate that is being done to them, therefore my life’s work is to give as many farmed animals as I can, a life of a loving sanctuary. But we are only one sanctuary. 

Meet one of our rescues, Harriet

Harriet before

When we rescued Harriet

Harriet After

Harriet after we sheered her

About Pippa and Poppet

Pippa and Poppet are two sweet rabbits being cared for at Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary. Born just a few weeks ago, they had three siblings that unfortunately didn’t survive. We started feeding them with an eye dropper because they were so tiny. Today, they are happy and thriving, thanks to the support of caring people like you.

These two little bunnies have found their forever home with us, but sadly many more animals are still in need. Now more than ever, as communities face economic hardship due to COVID-19, our phone is ringing off the hook with requests to take animals in need. Freedom Farm relies on the support of people like you and, because we had to cancel our upcoming events, our donations are down.

About Matilda

Matilda was sent to a slaughter auction when she was just a baby. She was very sick with coccidia and infested with lice. She had a nasty infection from the slaughter tag that was punched through her ear. Luckily, Matilda was saved and will live the remainder of her life free from pain, suffering and fear, here at Freedom Farm Animal Sanctuary. Many, many other farmed animals are not as fortunate.

Matilda
Matilda